Learnership Management System

Organizing your presentation

Overview

Whether preparing an informative presentation or a persuasive presentation, you need to be organized.

Listeners expect good organization in a business presentation.

It is doubly important for the speaker to be organized. You must understand the organization styles that work best for you, and the organizational styles that work best for listeners.

There are four time-tested, easy-to-use techniques for organizing a
presentation.

Two of these organizational techniques have names that
probably sound familiar: inductive and deductive. A third organizational technique is the four-step outline. It can be used with the inductive and deductive techniques. The fourth technique is numerical transitional simple way to organize topics for both speaker and listener.

Inductive Organization
In inductive organization, ideas, arguments, and evidence are presented in a sequence moving from specific to general. The speaker presents specific, related points leading to a general conclusion.

Visually, it looks like this:

    (x) Point 1.
    (x) Point 2.
    (x) Point 3.
    (X) Conclusion.

Use as many related, specific points as necessary to reach your general conclusion.

Here is a presentation outline organized inductively:

(x) Good muscle tone gives a good appearance.
(x) A strong heart is achievable through fitness.
(x) Regular exercise builds fitness.
(X) Enroll in an aerobics class this week.

Note how the outline moves from specific points to a general conclusion.

Inductive organization is best used in presentations that are:

• Intended to persuade.
• Technical in nature.
• Delivered to unfamiliar listeners.

Deductive Organization
In deductive organization, the general conclusion is presented first then supported with specific points, examples, and elaboration.

Visually, it looks like this:

(X) General conclusion.
(x) Point 1.
(x) Point 2.
(x) Point3.

Use as many specific points as necessary to support the initial general conclusion.

Here is a presentation outline organized deductively:

(X) Air travel is not pleasant.
(x) Most seats are small and crowded together.
(x) Flying is frequently bumpy and uncomfortable.
(x) Baggage is easily lost during transfers.

Note how the outline moves from the general to the specific. Deductive organizing is best used in presentations that are:

• Given within a short time frame.
• Emotional in nature.